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Run from the weather

So, did the weather cheat you out of a tour? Pretty boring, right? Well this is what we have to live with up here. The weather plays a big role in our lives and we often have to change our plans on short notice because of a storm or when the snow closes all roads. Here are the battle tricks we can recommend when you are fighting the Icelandic weather.

Posted by: Chloé Estienne


It‘s time you showed the weather!

People often ask me how I survive the Icelandic winter with it‘s vertical rain and the wind screaming you in the face most of the time. Well, to tell the truth, I scream back. That's how I survive the winters. There is nothing like the feeling of having won over nature. Nothing like coming in after a challenging battle and having the the feeling that you have had the upper hand. Hah, I win, you can‘t stop me!

Here is a battle trick I can recommend when you are fighting the Icelandic weather: Go out running! Yes, I know, this might sound crazy but, for me it is the only way to stay sane in Iceland when the weather goes mad.

Winter running in Iceland

Running has become more and more popular in Iceland over the years and The Reykjavik Marathon (is by far the largest public sporting event in Iceland, with over 16.000 participants in 2014. Though the Marathon might mark an end of the running summer for some, the group running all year around grows bigger year by year.

Along the seaside in Reykjavik you can find excellent running paths and most swimming pools in Reykjavik also have some paths marked and of course you can always choose to run into the wild and go wherever your feet take you. Whatever you may decide, there are some things you have to be aware of:

1) Dress according to the weather

– woolen shirt and long johns under wind (and rain) proof running clothes.

2) Remember your hat and gloves

– do take a proper hat that covers your ears. The wind can blow from all directions even during a short run.

3) Make sure that you are seen

– if it is not dark when you go out, it might be when you come back. The days are so short!

4) Mind your feet

– it can be very slippery even though you don't see it. Make sure you have the right footwear.

5) Be safe

– as long as you are on a path, away from traffic, you are fine. But as soon as you get close to the streets, please be careful. Icelandic drivers are not exactly famous for their politeness. If you ever find yourself behind the wheels, I hope you you have looked up useful information about driving (and don't run me over).

With growing number of year-round runners more and more scheduled public runs are being arranged. For example the Power aid winter running series that take place second Thursday in the winter months – will I see you there?

Contributed: Heiðrún Ólafsdóttir